The Plight of Orcas in Captivity, Around the World

Two orca swimming in an aquarium tank.
“20140707 Port of Nagoya Aquarium 1,” photo by Bong Grit on Flickr, Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0). This aquarium opened in 1992 and has had several orcas over the past 20 years. They currently have three.

The marine amusement park industry is thriving on the eastern side of the world, due to economic growth and an expanding middle class stimulating the entertainment industry. This means cetacean captivity has also increased in countries such as Russia, China, and Japan. As I mentioned in a previous article, wild captures of orcas have been outlawed or restricted in many parts of the world. However, the growth in marine amusement parks coupled with an absence of restrictions has led to a renewed increased in wild cetacean captures. It has also, unfortunately, prompted the creation of breeding programs in the eastern world, just when the western side is finally addressing the end of such practices.

“I foresee SeaWorld expanding overseas, where it would no longer be beholden to pressure from US legislators and public opinion. The premise of the company – to make money off the façade of conservation – has not changed from the 1960s and 1970s. And, if Americans learn to see through the terminology – ‘conservation through education’; ‘raising awareness for the species’; ‘in the care of man’ – then there will be fresh audiences overseas who may still buy into the mythology.” -John Hargrove, former SeaWorld senior trainer

Sea World Kamogawa orca show with trainer sitting on an orca's rostrum.
Sea World Kamogawa orca show. Image by Hetarllen Mumriken on Flickr, Creative Commons license (CC BY-SA 2.0)

The Potential For Endangering Populations

Russian fishermen can catch belugas and orcas with a permit for ‘science and education’ under an allowable quota. But some believe that Russian orcas, which can sell for millions of dollars, are caught illegally and exported to China.According to the Far East Russia Orca Project (FEROP), in

“China’s marine park industry got started only about ten years ago…whereas people in the West have been familiar with marine entertainment for decades.”6

Trainer posing with an orca at Sea World Kamogawa
Sea World Kamogawa in Japan. Image by Jason Robins from Pixabay. This facility has four orcas.

China

In China alone in the last five years, about 30 new marine amusement parks and dolphinariums have opened. This brings the country’s total to over 80 parks. There are plans to open approximately another 25 parks. The China Cetacean Alliance estimates that combined, these facilities have at least 1,000 cetaceans in captivity,

“China appears to be immune to the ‘Blackfish effect,’ the term often used to describe the public’s response to the film…Chimelong [Ocean Kingdom] has paved the way for more orca breeding in China.”9

Chimelong Ocean Kingdom in China

Cartoon sculpture of a whale with fountain at Chimelong Ocean Kingdom
Photo of Chimelong Ocean Kingdom, by xiquinhosilva on Flickr, Creative Commons license (CC BY 2.0)

Moskvarium, Moscow, Russia

it appeared that they were “enamored with the SeaWorld approach so I would expect loud music, the usual jumping through hoops and other circus-type routines,” as well as a breeding program like SeaWorld’s.

Orca performing at the Moskvarium in Moscow
“Moskvarium Orcas,” photo by Kenny Grady on Flickr, Creative Commons license (CC BY-ND 2.0)

“Marine parks and shows make great attractions. Enamored and awed by the creatures, most people fail to realize the animals’ plight. In the news, training facilities are portrayed as caring institutions, marine mammals as happy, and their arrivals as celebratory events.”

The Future

In 2018, the infamous Russian “whale jail” made worldwide headlines. Whale hunters illegally captured around 11 orcas and 87 belugas and held them in a series of small cells in Sreadnyaya Bay near Vladivostok. Fortunately, by 2020, the captors eventually released most of these animals but only after intense activism, investigations, and legal proceedings.

If you want additional information about captive orcas worldwide, Inherently Wild maintains a page on its website listing all known captured orca.

How do we stop this practice worldwide? Is it through education, legislation, or activism? I don’t know the answer. But I do know that it took a combination of the three in the United States just to get minimal improvements on marine mammal captivity. But we still aren’t anywhere near where we need to be. My hope is that people worldwide will continue to learn about and value the natural world. Thanks for reading, please share and subscribe!

 

 

Additional Resources:

Report, “Orcas in captivity,” Whale and Dolphin Conservation, updated August 8, 2019.

Time running out for orcas, belugas trapped in icy ‘whale jail’

Video, “Inside China’s booming ocean theme parks,” China Dialogue Ocean, February 19, 2021.

Article, “Orcas don’t do well in captivity. Here’s why.” National Geographic, March 25, 2019.

Footnotes:

  1. Beneath the Surface: Killer Whales, SeaWorld, and the Truth Beyond Blackfish, by John Hargrove with Howard Chua-Eoan, St. Martin’s Griffin, New York, 2016
  2. Article, “Suffering unseen: The dark truth behind wildlife tourism
  3. Article, “The Fate of Orcas in Captivity: History of Orca Captures,” The Whale and Dolphin Conservation organization, accessed March 6, 2021.
  4. Article, “For Sale: Wild Russian Killer Whales,” Hakai Magazine, March 21, 2017.
  5. Article, “Far East Russia Orca Project (FEROP),” The Whale and Dolphin Conservation organization, accessed March 6, 2021.
  6. Article, “China’s First Orca Breeding Center Sparks Controversy,” National Geographic, March 17, 2017.
  7. Article, “Inside China’s booming ocean theme parks
  8. Report, Rose, N.A. and Parsons, E.C.M. (2019). The Case Against Marine Mammals in Captivity, 5th edition (Washington, DC: Animal Welfare Institute and World Animal Protection), 160 pp.
  9. Article, “China’s First Orca Breeding Center Sparks Controversy,” National Geographic, March 17, 2017.
  10. Article, “China’s First Orca Breeding Center Sparks Controversy,” National Geographic, March 17, 2017.
  11. Article, “Exclusive: The Fate of Russia’s Two Captive Orcas is Starting to Look a lot Like SeaWorld
  12. Page, “About Moskvarium,” Moskvarium website, accessed April 7, 2021.
  13. Article, “For Sale: Wild Russian Killer Whales
  14. Article, “The Fate of Orcas in Captivity: History of Orca Captures,” The Whale and Dolphin Conservation organization, accessed March 6, 2021.
  15. Page, “Captive Orcas: A look at killer whales in marine parks and aquariums

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